Treaties

The Geneva Conventions of August 12, 1949, and their Additional Protocols, form the foundation of modern international humanitarian law. Regulating the conduct of fighters during armed conflict and protecting vulnerable populations such as civilians, medical personnel, and those wounded on the battlefield, the Geneva Conventions are an essential mechanism limiting the impact of war. The four Geneva Conventions of 1949 are the only treaties which have been adopted by every nation, illustrating the importance placed on preserving human dignity during even the worst situations of violence.

Geneva Convention (I) of August 12, 1949
Convention (I) for the Amelioration of the Conditions of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field

Geneva Convention (II) of August 12, 1949
Convention (II) for the Amelioration of the Condition of Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members of Armed Forces at Sea

Geneva Convention (III) of August 12, 1949
Convention (III) relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War

Geneva Convention (IV) of August 12, 1949
Convention (IV) relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Times of War

Additional Protocol (I) to the Geneva Conventions of August 12, 1949 (June 8,1977)
Relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts

Additional Protocol (II) to the Geneva Conventions of August 12, 1949 (JUne 8, 1977)
Relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts

Additional Protocol (III) to the Geneva Conventions of August 12, 1949 (December 8, 2005)
Relating to the Adoption of an Additional Distinction Emblem (the Red Crystal)