Susan's Story

Susan's Story
I’ll never know how much of a difference that would have made, but I’m very grateful to have found it quickly, thanks to the Red Cross.

I came in and gave blood (like every 8-10 weeks). It seemed perfectly normal, and I felt perfectly normal. But, the day after my last donation, the Red Cross called me, and told me I should go to the doctor and have my blood tested. They told me that my white blood cell count was very high, and that it needed to be evaluated. I went to my family doctor, and then an oncologist/hematologist. They drew blood and finally drew bone marrow. I was diagnosed with Leukemia (CML) and this has been very difficult, but if the Red Cross hadn’t told me about my blood being abnormal, I would not have discovered this by myself. I had NO symptoms and it could have developed over a much longer period of time. I’ll never know how much of a difference that would have made, but I’m very grateful to have found it quickly, thanks to the Red Cross.

I won’t be able to give blood for a long time – if ever, but I have told this story to all of my students, colleagues, friends and family members. They all recognize how good it is to give blood – not only for victims who need blood, but for the blood donors themselves.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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