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Survival Scenarios:A Passport to Preparedness for Middleschoolers

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“We encouraged the students to present their scenario solutions in creative ways,” said Nicole Girley-Hidineger, an AmeriCorps member who led the training.

Over the course of the 2014-2015 academic year, there were three components to the Red Cross preparedness education projects in King County: The Pillow Case Project, Passport to Preparedness and First Aid.

As a part of Passport to Preparedness, the AmeriCorps instructors taught “Survival Scenarios,” a curriculum developed and targeted specifically for middle school students, aged 12-15 years.

As a part of Passport to Preparedness, the AmeriCorps instructors taught “Survival Scenarios,” a curriculum developed and targeted specifically for middle school students, aged 12-15 years. The goal was to prompt students to consider how they could best respond to the most likely emergencies that they would encounter in the Pacific Northwest region. The students were divided into small groups and were assigned one of five different disaster scenario: home fire, earthquake, extreme cold weather, tsunami and volcano. Upon the sounding of a siren, the students were instructed to begin outlining their response.

As they went along, the instructors introduced new challenges into the scenario, issues that would likely come up through the course of an emergency. This includes logistical challenges, injuries, etc. As a part of the curriculum, the instructors taught the students about the inherent risks of a specific natural disaster. As an example, they were introduced a lahar— a landslide or mudflow of debris in a volcanic eruption. They learned that in the event of an eruption of Mt. Rainier, the resulting lahar will reach 40 feet in height and travel at the rate of 60 miles an hour.

“We encouraged the students to present their scenario solutions in creative ways,” said Nicole Girley-Hidineger, an AmeriCorps member who led the training. Some of the students performed skits and others turned their scenarios into rap songs and performed it to the group.

AmeriCorps trainers estimate that they taught Survival Scenarios to 2302 students at 12 different schools.