Hometown Heroes 2014: Nominate a West Michigan Hero

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The American Red Cross of West Michigan is seeking nominees for the 2014 Hometown Heroes Celebration.

The American Red Cross of West Michigan is seeking nominees for the 2014 Hometown Heroes Celebration in the following 7 categories:

To make a nomination, click here.

Clara Barton Humanitarian of the Year Award

Clara Barton is one of the most honored women in American history for being a true pioneer as well as an outstanding humanitarian. Among her many accomplishments, at age 60, she founded the American Red Cross in 1881. Her understanding of the needs of people in distress and her intense devotion to the aim of serving others resulted in enough achievements to fill several ordinary lifetimes. This award recognizes an individual who inspires us through their philanthropy, community involvement, and commitment to recognizing the humanity of their neighbors – down the street, across the country, and around the world.

Jane Delano Lifesaver Award

Jane Delano, a leading pioneer of the modern nursing profession, almost single-handedly created American Red Cross Nursing. While she was organizing Red Cross Nursing for service to the military, Delano also developed Red Cross courses in Elementary Hygiene and Home Care of the Sick. She prepared courses for the training of nurses' aides and established the Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service for delivering health care to rural areas of the country. This award recognizes an individual or a group of individuals who’ve acted bravely in an emergency to save a life.

Mabel Boardman Spirit of Volunteerism Award

Mabel Boardman was appointed to the Executive Committee of the American Red Cross in 1903. Under her leadership the organization established an endowment fund, drew the scattered and independent units of the Red Cross into a network of nationally chartered chapters, and undertook a major expansion of the Red Cross volunteer corps and the number of services they offered to the public, including nursing, first aid, and water safety. This award recognizes an individual who has dedicated their life to the service of their community as a volunteer.

Caroline Campbell Community Impact Award

In early February of 1917, Mrs. Caroline Campbell received a telegram with orders to establish a local chapter of the American Red Cross. Within the month, Mrs. Campbell had organized the first meeting of the American Red Cross of Kent County. By July of 1917, the chapter had over 37,000 contributing members. This award recognizes an individual or organization that has made an extraordinary impact on the West Michigan Community by pioneering a program or initiative to accomplish positive change in our community.

Henry Dunant Global Impact Award

After witnessing one of the bloodiest battles of the nineteenth century, Henry Dunant wrote a small book entitled A Memory of Solferino. His vision of relief organizations to provide care for the wartime wounded and to appeal to everyone to volunteer to care for those injured in conflict led to the creation of the worldwide Red Cross and Red Crescent movement and the original Geneva Conventions. For this work, he was a joint recipient of the first Nobel peace prize. This award recognizes an individual or organization that has looked beyond their backyard to serve and improve the lives of people from around the world.

Dr. Charles Drew Health Advocate Award

Dr. Charles Drew established and was the first director of the American Red Cross blood bank. Dr. Drew pioneered a system for storing blood plasma that revolutionized the medical profession. By separating the liquid red blood cells from the near solid plasma and freezing the two separately, he found that blood could be preserved and reconstituted at a later date. This award recognizes an individual who has dedicated their life to a cause that directly impacts the health and wellbeing of others.

General George Marshall Patriot Award

After a distinguished military career during which he rose to the rank of General of the Army during World War II, Marshall dedicated his life to the causes of international peace and security. He used the force of his personal prestige to increase the visibility of the Red Cross during his short tenure as its President, lending his personal support to the blood program and travelling extensively around the country visiting Red Cross chapters. In 1953 Marshall received the Nobel Prize for Peace. This award recognizes an individual or a group of individuals who have gone above and beyond the call of duty in service to the United States of America and in service to our men and women in uniform.

To make a nomination click here.