Are You Red Cross Ready for some Football?

Superbowl Party
You should definitely have the Red Cross First Aid App – available for iphones and Androids.

This year’s Sunday Super Bowl promises to be a tense, hard-fought, physical game. For the thousands in our community who will be having their own tense, hard-shouting, fist-bumping, nachos snacking Super Bowl parties, the Red Cross wants to give you the following tips to stay safe.

There are many potential pitfalls for viewers to face from inadvertent tail gate fires, to choking on a hot dog, to banging your fist against the wall when your team fails a field goal attempt.

The American Red Cross offers classes in your area, teaching CPR, water safety, first aid – information to deal with many life-threatening emergencies.

You should definitely have the Red Cross First Aid App. You can find the app in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android.

And, make plans to get to the next level of safety by enrolling in an American Red Cross first aid and CPR course:

In the meantime here are ways to stay Red Cross Ready.

If You’re Driving to a Super Bowl Party:

  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drive impaired. By impaired, we mean don’t drink and drive. If you plan on drinking, designate a driver who won’t drink.
  • Be well rested and alert.
  • Give your full attention to the road. Avoid distractions such as cell phones, shouting instructions at the players on the field or the refs.
  • Observe speed limits – driving too fast or too slow can increase your chance of being in a collision.
  • Be respectful of other motorists and follow the rules of the road. Don’t follow another vehicle too closely.
  • Turn your headlights on as dusk approaches, or if you are using your windshield wipers due to inclement weather.
  • Carry a Disaster Supplies Kit in your trunk. The Red Cross has many options for auto preparedness.
  • Pay attention to the weather forecast for your destination.
  • If You’re entertaining guests and someone starts to choke:

  • Choking is a common breathing emergency that accounts for more than 3,000 deaths each year. Typically, choking victims will instinctively grab their throat and may panic, wheeze or gasp for breath.
  • If a person can cough, speak and has normal skin color, there is a partial blockage of the airway that can most likely be resolved by coughing. Encourage the person to continue coughing, which can help to dislodge the object causing the obstruction.
  • If the person cannot breathe, speak or cough, the windpipe is completely blocked and the person needs emergency help. A person whose airway is blocked can quickly stop breathing and lose consciousness so you must act quickly. Have someone call for help while you begin to provide care.
  • When someone is choking but is still conscious, your goal is to open the airway as quickly as possible. A combination of five back blows and five abdominal thrusts provides an effective way to clear the airway obstruction.
  • To give back blows:

    Firmly position yourself slightly behind the person. Provide support by placing one arm diagonally across the chest and lean the person forward. Firmly strike the person on the back between the shoulder blades with the heel of your other hand.

    To give abdominal thrusts:

    Start by standing or kneeling behind the victim and wrapping your arms around his or her waist. Make a fist with one hand and place the thumb side against the middle of the victim's abdomen, just above the navel and well below the lower tip of the breastbone. Grab your fist with your other hand and give quick inward and upward thrusts into the abdomen.

    Repeat this combination until the object becomes dislodged or the victim becomes unconscious. If the person becomes unconscious or is unresponsive, they will need a modified CPR technique known as first aid for unconscious choking. Unconscious choking requires more in-depth care that involves rescue breathing, chest compressions and checking for a foreign object.

    May the best team win!