Anyone can be a “Hero for the American Red Cross”

The goal is to involve as many community members as possible. The money can be contributed by the individual, the employer of the individual, donated by friends and co-workers, or raised by customer donations.

Anyone can be a “Hero for the American Red Cross” by providing $1,000 in financial support for the community services of the Red Cross.

The goal is to involve as many community members as possible. The money can be contributed by the individual, the employer of the individual, donated by friends and co-workers, or raised by customer donations.

Here’s How You Can Do It!

  • If you are able, make a personal or business contribution of $1,000.
  • Ask professional associates to make a contribution to support your effort.
  • Ask your employer to make the contribution.
  • If you are an educator, ask the students and faculty of your school to raise the money through a coin drive or selling “Red Cross Squares” to display in the school.
  • High school clubs and organizations can do a number of things to raise $1,000.
  • If you are a of a faith community, ask members of the congregation to contribute to your efforts.
  • If you are in retail, banking, or the restaurant business, ask customers to donate, or to buy “Red Cross Squares,” which are displayed in the business.
  • If you manage a business, ask your vendors to support your efforts.
  • If you are a member of a civic club, ask other members to contribute.
  • If you are retired, ask neighbors or friends to support your efforts.
  • Recruit college sororities, fraternities, or service organizations.
  • Any company can help an employee become a hero by conducting a raffle, holding a “dress down day,” or selling lunches. The “Heroes for the American Red Cross” campaign will bring forth a tremendous surge of creativity and visibility in your community. Some interesting examples include:

  • A retired farmer sits in the local gas station and convenience store for three days asking customers to give to the Red Cross. He raised $2,900.
  • Two post office clerks asked customers they knew to donate their change, raising $1,800.
  • Firemen held a boot drive for one day at a local Walmart and raised $3,900.
  • A restaurant asked each customer to donate change after paying their tab and raised $1,600.
  • A pizza restaurant sold “Red Cross Squares” to customers raising $1,200.
  • The employee council of a manufacturer cooked and sold hot dogs and hamburgers one day a week for three weeks and raised $1,100.
  • A physician in a large medical practice asked the other doctors for at least $100 and raised $2,600.
  • An auto dealership offered to give $25 for each time someone took a test drive for a three-week period and raised $1,450.
  • A popular radio disc jockey asked listeners to make him a hero and raised $3,300.
  • A grocery store raffled off a $250 gift certificate raising $1,120.
  • A college fraternity raised their $1,000 from member and parent contributions.
  • A running club conducted a small run for the Red Cross and raised $1,600.
  • A parking meter monitor in a small town asked folks she saw on her day-to-day rounds and raised $2,100.
  • A high school service club held a car wash-a-thon and raised $1,150
  • A hospital cafeteria asked employees and visitors to donate change at the end of the line and raised $1,587.
  • Four branches of a bank sold “Red Cross Squares” to customers and raised $2,400.
  • An administrator of a technical school asked employees and students to contribute and raised $1,089.
  • A member of a civic club asked the club and its members for support and raised $1,150. The club donated $500 and members contributed $650.