Shelter Open for Everett Apt Fire, Assistance for Wa Wildfires

Many people have been forced to leave their homes and we’ve seen too many families facing heart-breaking loss.

Red Cross volunteers and staff are responding to emergencies at the local and the state-wide level as fire destroyed a Southeast Everett apartment complex building and wildfires continue to consume the Methow Valley and other areas in Central Washington.

Early Sunday morning, the Red Cross deployed a disaster action team to assist residents displaced by an apartment fire in Southeast Everett. The fire broke out at approximately 2:30 a.m., affecting all 12 units in the building. The Red Cross quickly established a shelter nearby, where approximately 16 people stayed the night on Sunday. Red Cross volunteers will continue to assess residents’ needs on Monday while providing shelter, food and resources, as well as health and mental health support, to all those affected by the fire.

The apartment complex fire comes in tandem with the deployment of local Red Cross staff and volunteers to assist disaster response efforts in Eastern Washington, in what is known as Carlton Complex fire. Four staff and two volunteers, in addition to one emergency response vehicle (ERV) have been deployed from the local chapter in response to the fires, and more will be sent as needed.

“Many people have been forced to leave their homes and we’ve seen too many families facing heart-breaking loss. We want to be there for them when they really need help,” said Chuck Morrison, Executive Director, Northwest Washington Region. “An apartment fire or a wildfire, either way, it’s going to be a long recovery process and Red Cross will continue to support these families and communities in the process of getting back on their feet.”

The Red Cross is operating four shelters in Winthrop, Brewster, Omak and Chelan. The wildfires have spread more than 300 square miles, the largest in Washington State history. The Red Cross will continue to provide shelter and meals for those affected and distribute preparedness information on evacuation procedures. There are also emergency response vehicles to provide assistance in needed communities.

“In terms of emergency response, this year is like few others,” Morrison added, noting that the Red Cross continues long-term recovery work in the 530 landslide disaster, the second deadliest disaster in state history. “For those who want to help, financial assistance remains the most effective and allows the greatest flexibility to put resources where they are needed most.”

How You Can Help

Help people affected by disasters like homefires, wildfires and countless other crises by making a gift to American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. Visit redcross.org/donate, or call 1-800-REDCROSS. Contributions may also be sent to your local Red Cross chapter, or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.