Introduction: About Efforts to Outlaw War (3/3)

Following World War II, Charter of the United Nations, 1945

PREAMBLE

WE THE PEOPLES OF THE UNITED NATIONS DETERMINED

to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice in our lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind, and

to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and

to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and

to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

AND FOR THESE ENDS

to practise tolerance and live together in peace with one another as good neighbours, and

to unite our strength to maintain international peace and security, and

to ensure, by the acceptance of principles and the institution of methods, that armed force shall not be used, save in the common interest…

ARTICLE 2

…All Members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State….

ARTICLE 42

…It [the Security Council] may take such action by air, sea, or land forces as may be necessary to maintain or restore international peace and security…

ARTICLE 51

Nothing in the present Charter shall impair the inherent right of individual or collective self-defence if an armed attack occurs against a Member of the United Nations…

Note: It is important to note that international humanitarian law addresses the reality of armed conflict without considering the reasons for, or the legality of, the use of force.

Since the end of World War II, there have been 228 armed conflicts active in 148 locations throughout the world.

– Lotta Harbom and Peter Wallensteen, Uppsala University, article in Journal of Peace Research

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