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To reach out for free 24/7 counseling or support, contact the Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs’ to 66746.

Disasters are upsetting experiences for everyone involved. Children, senior citizens, people with disabilities and people for whom English is not their first language are especially at risk and are likely to need extra care and help. But everyone, even the people that others look up to for guidance and assistance, is entitled to their feelings and deserves support throughout the recovery process.

Emotional Responses


When we experience a disaster or other stressful life event, we can have a variety of reactions, all of which can be common responses to difficult situations.

These reactions can include:

  • Feeling physically and mentally drained
  • Having difficulty making decisions or staying focused on topics
  • Becoming easily frustrated on a more frequent basis
  • Arguing more with family and friends
  • Feeling tired, sad, numb, lonely or worried
  • Experiencing changes in appetite or sleep patterns
  • Most of these reactions are temporary and will go away over time. Try to accept whatever reactions you may have. Look for ways to take one step at a time and focus on taking care of your disaster-related needs and those of your family.

    Keep a particularly close eye on the children in your family. When disaster strikes, a child's view of the world as a safe and predictable place is temporarily lost. Children of different ages react in different ways to trauma, but how parents and other adults react following any traumatic event can help children recover more quickly and more completely. Your local Red Cross can give you information about helping children cope with disaster and trauma.

    Recovery Takes Time


    Getting ourselves and our lives back in a routine that is comfortable for us takes time.
  • Take care of your safety. Find a safe place to stay and make sure your physical health needs and those of your family are addressed. Seek medical attention if necessary.
  • Limit your exposure to the sights and sounds of disaster, especially on television, the radio and in the newspapers.
  • Eat healthy. During times of stress, it is important that you maintain a balanced diet and drink plenty of water.
  • Get some rest. With so much to do, it may be difficult to have enough time to rest or get adequate sleep. Giving your body and mind a break can boost your ability to cope with the stress you may be experiencing.
  • Stay connected with family and friends. Giving and getting support is one of the most important things you can do. Try to do something as a family that you have all enjoyed in the past.
  • Be patient with yourself and with those around you. Recognize that everyone is stressed and may need some time to put their feelings and thoughts in order. That includes you!
  • Set priorities. Tackle tasks in small steps.
  • Gather information about assistance and resources that will help you and your family members meet your disaster-related needs.
  • Stay positive. Remind yourself of how you’ve successfully gotten through difficult times in the past. Reach out when you need support, and help others when they need it.
  • When the Challenges Are Ongoing


    Many people have experience coping with stressful life events and typically feel better after a few days. Others find that their stress does not go away as quickly as they would like and it influences their relationships with their family, friends and others.

    If you find yourself or a loved one experiencing some of the feelings and reactions listed below for two weeks or longer, this may be a sign that you need to reach out for additional assistance.

  • Crying spells or bursts of anger
  • Difficulty eating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Losing interest in things
  • Increased physical symptoms sucha as headaches or stomachaches
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling guilty, helpless or hopeless
  • Avoiding family and friends
  • Coping with Disasters During the Holidays


    Disasters are stressful, especially during the holidays.

    IThe good news is that stress after a disaster or during the holidays is common and usually temporary. Also, we all have experience coping with stressful events and can usually “bounce back” after difficult times.

    Here is some information on disaster reactions and tips for taking care of the emotional health of you, your family and friends during the holidays.

    Each positive action you take can help you feel better and more in control.

    When recovering from a disaster, especially during the holidays, we can have a variety of reactions, all of which are common. Most of these reactions are temporary and will go away over time. Try to accept whatever reactions you may have. Look forward, one small step at a time, and focus on taking care of your needs and those of your friends and family.

    These reactions can inlude:

  • Feeling sad that a normally joyful time of the year now feels burdened with trying to find a new home or with memories of a lost loved one
  • Feeling lonely, especially when holiday sights and sounds remind us of happier times or of those we will be missing from this year’s rituals
  • Feeling overwhelmed or unable to plan daily activities, including holiday activities
  • Feeling physically and mentally drained
  • Having difficulty making decisions or staying focused on tasks at hand
  • Becoming easily frustrated with daily tasks or with family and friends
  • Arguing more with those around us
  • Feeling tired, numb, or worried
  • Experiencing changes in appetite or sleep patterns
  • Increasing alcohol or substance use
  • Children can experience all of the reactions above, but they can also resume earlier behaviors (e.g., thumb-sucking or bed-wetting or “acting out”)
  • Click to access this information in printable format.

    Take care of your safety. Focus first on ensuring you have a safe place to stay and that your physical needs are met.

    Eat healthy. Maintain a balanced diet and drink plenty of water. Too much holiday “cheer” can increase your stress.

    Get some rest. With so much to do, it can be difficult to rest or get adequate sleep. Giving your body and mind a break can boost your ability to cope with stress.

    Reach out to others. If you find yourself in new surroundings, reach out to those around you. Giving and receiving support is important.

    Be patient with yourself and with those around you. Recognize that others may be struggling to cope with the disaster during the holidays and may need your patience and support.

    Honor your holiday traditions, but be flexible and prepared to engage in new activities this year.

    Set priorities. Tackle tasks in small steps.

    Gather information about assistance and resources that will help you and your family members meet your needs.

    Stay positive. Remind yourself of how you’ve successfully gotten through difficult times in the past.

    If you have children, give them extra time, hugs and patience. Provide them with reassurance of your family’s recovery plans. Involving them in activities to assist others can help them cope.

    Click to access this information in printable format.

    Many people have experience coping with stressful life events and typically feel better after a few days. Others find that their stress does not go away as quickly as they would like and it influences their relationships with their family, friends and others.

    If you find yourself or a loved one experiencing some of the feelings and reactions listed below for two weeks or more, this may be a sign that you need to reach out for additional assistance.

  • Crying spells or bursts of anger
  • Difficulty eating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Losing interest in things
  • Increased physical symptoms, such as headaches, stomachaches,
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling guilty, helpless or hopeless
  • Avoiding family and friends
  • Increasing alcohol or substance use
  • Click to access this information in a printable format.

    Resources


    Guides available in multiple languages

    For additional resources, contact your local Red Cross Disaster Mental Health or community mental health professional.

    Please seek immediate help if you or someone you know is feeling that life isn’t worth living or if you are having thoughts of harming yourself or others.

    You can also contact the Disaster Distress Hotline, sponsored by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, by calling 800-985-5990.

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