Nebraska Red Cross Provides Comfort for Tornado Victims in Edgar

Learn more about recovering from a tornado
In the days and weeks to come, Central Plains Chapter will be coordinating with emergency officials and local community partners to help residents impacted by the tornado get back on their feet. -- Donna Titman, Community Chapter Executive.

The Central Plains Chapter is on the scene in Edgar, NE to help those affected by Monday nights tornado. Teams of Red Cross workers are at the Edgar Fire Hall where people are receiving a hot meal, and had a shoulder to lean on.

“In the days and weeks to come, Central Plains Chapter will be coordinating with emergency officials and local community partners to help residents impacted by the tornado get back on their feet,” said Donna Titman, Community Chapter Executive.

Residents who need immediate assistance should call the Central Plains Chapter toll free number: 1-888-382-3790.

Download Tornado App

The American Red Cross Tornado App is available in English or Spanish and gives iPhone, iPad and Android smart phone and tablet users instant access to local and real-time information, so they know what to do before, during and after a tornado.

The free tornado app includes a high-pitched siren and “tornado warning!” alert that signals when a NOAA tornado warning has been issued. This feature allows users to make critical decisions and to take actions to help keep themselves and their loved ones safe even in the middle of the night. An “all clear!” alert lets users know when a tornado warning has expired or has been cancelled.

There are several chances of severe thunderstorms over the next couple of days. The Red Cross offers the following tips for those in the affected area to stay safer:

• Continue listening to local radio or television stations or a NOAA Weather Radio for updated information and instructions. If you are away from home, return only when authorities say it is safe to do so.

• Avoid damaged areas as your presence might hamper rescue and other emergency operations and put you at further risk from the residual effects of tornadoes.

• Stay out of damaged buildings.

• When it is safe to return home, wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and sturdy shoes when examining your walls, doors, staircases and windows for damage.

• Watch out for fallen power lines or broken gas lines and report them to the utility company immediately.

• Use battery-powered lanterns or flashlights when examining buildings. Avoid using candles.

• If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and get everyone out of the building quickly. Turn off the gas using the outside main valve if you can, and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.

• Clean up spilled medications, bleaches, gasoline, or other flammable liquids that could become a fire hazard.

• Take pictures of the damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.

• Use the telephone only for emergency calls. Telephone lines are frequently overwhelmed in disaster situations. They need to be kept clear for emergency calls to get through.

• Watch your animals closely. Keep all your animals under your direct control. Your pets may be able to escape from your home or through a broken fence. Pets may become disoriented, particularly because tornadoes and the heavy rains that accompany them will usually affect scent markers that normally allow animals to find their homes.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.