Red Cross Home Fire Campaign Making a Difference

Home Fire Safety

The American Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign is already making a difference. In Albany, Georgia, a woman escaped to safety when her stove caught fire just days after the Red Cross installed a smoke alarm in her home.

The Red Cross and a local Boy Scout Troop installed the alarm over the weekend in the Georgia home as part of the nationwide campaign to reduce the number of deaths and injuries from home fires. Just days later, the woman turned on her self-cleaning oven and then took a nap. A pot of grease in the oven set off the smoke detector. The woman was able to wake up and escape her home, thanks to the new smoke alarm that helped save her life.

The Home Fire Preparedness Campaign is underway all across the country, aiming to reduce the number of home fire deaths and injuries by 25 percent over the next five years. The Red Cross is joining with fire departments and community groups across the United States to install smoke alarms in neighborhoods with a high risk for fires and educate people about fire safety.

NATIONWIDE EFFORT In Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the Red Cross joined with the local Fire Rescue and Health Department over the weekend to canvass 1,200 homes, installing smoke alarms where needed and educating residents about being prepared for emergencies.

Red Cross workers joined Laurel, Mississippi firefighters to canvass several neighborhoods at high risk for fires. "It went great, we were able to reach 140 homes," said Lattrice Averette, branch office coordinator for the East Central Mississippi Chapter of the Red Cross.

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the Red Cross joined with the city’s fire department to visit more than 300 homes. They made sure homes had smoke alarms and helped residents develop their fire escape plan.

Memphis, Tennessee Red Cross workers joined the city’s firefighters to knock on doors and install smoke alarms. They visited more than 400 homes and installed more than 40 smoke detectors.

DO YOU REALLY KNOW HOME FIRE SAFETY? According to a new survey conducted for the Red Cross, most Americans (62 percent) think they have at least five minutes to escape a burning home, when actually they have as little as two minutes.

Also most parents (69 percent) believe their children would know what to do if a fire occurred, even though less than half of them (48 percent) have talked to their families about fire safety. Get the full survey details on redcross.org.

You can help people affected by fires and countless other crises by making a donation to support Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. Visit redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The national public opinion survey was conducted for the Red Cross July 17-20, 2014 using ORC International’s Online CARAVAN omnibus survey. The study was conducted among a national sample of 1,130 American adults, including 311 parents of children aged 3-17. The total sample is balanced to be representative of the US adult population in terms of age, sex, geographic region, race and education. The margin of error for the total sample of 1,130 adults is +/- 2.92 percent. The margin of error for the sample of 311 parents is +/- 5.56 percent.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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