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Red Cross Encourages Preparedness For Tropical Storm Harvey

Red Cross volunteer helping lady in a shelter

Houston, TX, August 23, 2017 — With Weather System Harvey expected to redevelop, potentially impacting the Texas Gulf Coast and Louisiana, the American Red Cross is encouraging local residents to start getting prepared now. Ways to do this include: 

Be sure you’re Red Cross Ready. That means: 
• Assembling an emergency preparedness kit
• Creating a household evacuation plan that includes your pets. 
• Staying informed about your community’s risk and response plans. 
• Educating your family on how to use the Safe and Well website
• Download the Emergency App for iPhone >> or for Android >> 
• If you or a member of your household is an individual with access or functional needs, including a disability, consider developing a comprehensive evacuation plan in advance with family, care providers and care attendants, as appropriate. Complete a personal assessment of functional abilities and possible needs during and after an emergency or disaster situation, and create a personal support network to assist. 
o For detailed guidance, see FEMA’s Emergency Planning for People with Disabilities, Access and Functional Needs – FEMA – Landing Page (English open in Chrome) FEMA Checklist (English , Spanish , English – Large Print), Video (English language with American Sign Language open in Chrome) 
 
Know the difference between watches and warnings: 
• A Hurricane Watch is when conditions are a threat within 48 hours. It’s then time to review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued, and stay informed. 
• A Hurricane Warning is when conditions are expected within 36 hours. It’s then time to complete your storm preparations and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities. 
Tropical Storm Watches and Warnings: Take these alerts seriously. Although tropical storms have lower wind speeds than hurricanes, they often bring life-threatening flooding and dangerous winds. 
 
Protect your family: 
• Talk with your family about what to do if a major storm strikes. Discussions ahead of time help reduce fear, particularly for younger children. 
• Ensure that every member of your family carries a Safe and Well wallet card
• Make sure you have access to NOAA radio broadcasts: 
o Search for a NOAA radio app in the Apple Store >> or Google Play>> 
o Purchase a battery-powered or hand-crank NOAA radio in the Red Cross Store 
• Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box. You may need quick, easy access to these documents. Keep them in a safe place less likely to be damaged if a hurricane causes flooding. Take pictures on a phone and keep copies of important documents and files on a flash drive that you can carry with you on your house or car keys. 
 
Protect pets and animals: 
• Prepare a pet emergency kit for your companion animals. 
 
Protect your home: 
• Protect windows with permanent storm shutters or invest in one-half inch marine plywood that is pre-cut to fit your doors and windows. 
• Identify a place to store lawn furniture, toys, gardening tools and trash cans (away from stairs and exits) to prevent them from being moved by high winds and possibly hurting someone. 
• Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts to prevent flooding and unnecessary pressure on the awnings. 
• Remember that standard homeowners’ insurance doesn’t cover flooding but flood insurance does. Get information at www.FloodSmart.gov. (open in Chrome) 
 
Right before the storm hits: 
• Listen to local area radio, NOAA radio or TV stations for the latest information and updates. 
Be prepared to evacuate quickly and know your routes and destinations. Find a local emergency shelter
• Check your emergency kit and replenish any items missing or in short supply, especially medications or other medical supplies. Keep it nearby. 

 

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About the American Red Cross: 

The American Red Cross, a United Way Agency, shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross