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Red Cross Works with Homeowners to Develop Recovery Plans

Nebraska Spring 2014 Tornado Response
“Today our Red Cross disaster workers will continue to hand out coolers of ice, snacks, waters, work gloves, trash bags, and comfort kits to Beaver Crossing residents,” said Jill Orton, Regional Disaster

OMAHA, NEB., Thursday, May 15, 2014 – Well-trained American Red Cross caseworkers continue to meet with homeowners in Beaver Crossing, Sutton and Cordova to meet their immediate needs and begin to create individual family recovery plans. American Red Cross volunteers are participating in the multi-agency resource center (MARC) at the Methodist Church in Beaver Crossing, working alongside partnering agencies including the United Methodist, Nebraska VOAD and Veteran’s Services to provide a convenient one-stop center for affected families.

“Today our Red Cross disaster workers will continue to hand out coolers of ice, snacks, waters, work gloves, trash bags, and comfort kits to Beaver Crossing residents,” said Jill Orton, Regional Disaster Officer. “Since the storm passed, the Red Cross has delivered more than 3,000 meals, snacks and drinks and handed out 114 comfort kits.”

Nebraska Emergency Management Agency and Gary Petersen, director of emergency management in Seward County, are requesting volunteers who want to help call the Seward County Emergency Management office at (402) 643-4722 and leave their name and number. The office will coordinate matching volunteers with the work that needs to be done in the communities.

While many streets have been cleared of major debris, many areas are still littered with dangerous objects like nails and sharp objects. The Red Cross offers the following tips for those in the affected area to stay safer:

  • Stay out of damaged buildings.
  • If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and get everyone out of the building quickly. Turn off the gas using the outside main valve if you can, and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
  • Clean up spilled medications, bleaches, gasoline, or other flammable liquids that could become a fire hazard.
  • Take pictures of the damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls. Telephone lines are frequently overwhelmed in disaster situations. They need to be kept clear for emergency calls to get through.
  • Watch your animals closely. Keep all your animals under your direct control. Your pets may be able to escape from your home or through a broken fence. Pets may become disoriented, particularly because tornadoes and the heavy rains that accompany them will usually affect scent markers that normally allow animals to find their homes.
  • The Red Cross depends on the generosity of the American people to fulfill our mission. To help disaster victims please contact the American Red Cross redcross.org, or call 1-800-RED-CROSS.

    About the American Red Cross:

    The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at blog.redcross.org.