• Child & Baby First Aid


    When a child or baby is experiencing an emergency, it's important to provide care and seek help as quickly as possible. But because their bodies are still forming, more delicate, and more compact than an adult's, delivering child or baby first aid is different than administering care to an adult. In order to help you provide the right type of care, we've created a step-by-step guide that you can print up and place on your refrigerator, in your car, in your child's nursery, in your bag or at your desk.

    Before Giving Child or Baby First Aid


    1

    Check the scene for safety, form an initial impression, obtain consent from the parent or guardian, and use personal protective equipment (PPE)

    Giving First Aid


    1

    If the child or baby appears unresponsive, check the child or baby for responsiveness (shout-tap-shout)

    • For a child, shout to get the child’s attention, using the child’s name if you know it. If the child does not respond, tap the child’s shoulder and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
    • For a baby, shout to get the baby’s attention, using the baby’s name if you know it. If the baby does not respond, tap the bottom of the baby’s foot and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
    • CHECK for no more than 10 seconds

    2

    If the child or baby does not respond, responds but is not fully awake, is not breathing or is only gasping, or has life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition, immediately call 9-1-1 and give care based on the condition found and your level of training

    • If the child or baby does not respond and is not breathing or only gasping, immediately begin CPR, starting with compressions. Continue giving sets of 30 chest compressions and 2 breaths until:
      • You notice an obvious sign of life
      • An AED is ready to use
      • Another trained responder is available to take over compressions
      • EMS personnel arrive and begin their care
      • You are alone and too tired to continue
      • The scene becomes unsafe
      • You have performed approximately 2 minutes of CPR (5 sets of 30:2), you are alone and caring for baby, and you need to call 9-1-1

    3

    If the child or baby is responsive or responds to stimulation and is fully awake and does not appear to have a life-threatening condition:

    • Interview the child, parent or guardian
    • Do a focused check based on what the child, parent or guardian told you, how the child or baby is acting and what you see
    • Call 9-1-1 if needed, and give care based on the condition found and your level of training

    Of course, the key to providing care when it's needed most is to prepare for the unexpected. Find out how to get First Aid certified in first aid, CPR and AED use from the American Red Cross, or take a refresher course and renew your current certificate.